Research ResourcesHIV

Identification and characterization of HIV-specific resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid tissue

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Science Immunology  01 Jun 2018:
Vol. 3, Issue 24, eaar4526
DOI: 10.1126/sciimmunol.aar4526

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  • Identification and characterization of HIV-specific resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid tissue
    • Dianne Sika-Paotonu, Associate Dean (Pacific)/Senior Lecturer Pathology & Molecular Medicine, Wellington School of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Otago, New Zealand

    To the Editor,

    I read with keen interest the article published by Buggert M., et al. (1) and entitled: “Identification and characterization of HIV-specific resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid tissue.”

    It is known the HIV virus replicates and persists within Lymphoid Tissues (LTs), however exploring the HIV immune response within LTs has been problematic.

    Previous studies have focused on tracking HIV immune responses in the body using peripheral blood samples as a probable measure of immune activity within LTs.

    This work involved detailed assessment of CD8+T cell populations in peripheral blood samples, and in LTs from healthy and HIV+ individuals. Phenotypic, transcriptional and epigenetic analyses were undertaken on CD8+ T cells in these LTs.

    Strikingly, findings indicated that the HIV-specific CD8+ T cells found in peripheral blood samples, were not necessarily reflective of the HIV-specific CD8+ T cell populations in the LTs.

    The CD8+ T cells identified in the LTs of HIV+ individuals displayed signatures that were phenotypically, epigenetically and transcriptionally similar with resident memory T cells (TRMs).

    In addition, elite controllers (HIV+ individuals capable of spontaneous control of infection in the absence of antivetroviral therapy) were found to have high levels of HIV-specific TRMs in LTs, with enhanced effector capability.

    Further work to explore and understand the exact mechanisms by...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.