Science Immunology

The PDF file includes:

  • Fig. S1. Characterization of Maoa-KO mice (related to Fig. 1).
  • Fig. S2. MAO-A–deficient mice show suppressed tumor growth and enhanced CD8 T cell antitumor immunity (related to Fig. 1, E to M).
  • Fig. S3. MAO-A–deficient tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cells show enhanced mitochondrial electron transport chain gene expression (related to Fig. 1, K to M).
  • Fig. S4. MAO-A directly regulates antitumor immunity (related to Fig. 2, A to C).
  • Fig. S5. MAO-A directly regulates CD8 T cell antitumor immunity (related to Fig. 2, D to F).
  • Fig. S6. MAO-A acts as a negative-feedback regulator to restrain CD8 T cell activation (related to Fig. 3).
  • Fig. S7. MAO-A acts as a negative-feedback regulator to restrain CD8 T cell activation:
  • Studying antigen-specific T cells (related to Fig. 3).
  • Fig. S8. MAO-A regulates CD8 T cell autocrine serotonin signaling (related to Fig. 4).
  • Fig. S9. MAOI treatment induces CD8 T cell hyperactivation in vitro (related to Fig. 5A).
  • Fig. S10. MAO-A blockade for cancer immunotherapy: Syngeneic mouse tumor model studies (related to Fig. 5).
  • Fig. S11. MAO-A blockade for cancer immunotherapy: Immunodeficient NSG mouse tumor model studies (related to Fig. 5).
  • Fig. S12. MAO-A blockade for cancer immunotherapy: Human T cell studies (related to Fig. 6, A to D).
  • Fig. S13. Clinical data correlation studies identify MAO-A as a negative regulator of T cell antitumor function in patients with cancer (related to Fig. 6, E and F).
  • Fig. S14. The intratumoral MAO-A–serotonin axis model.
  • Table S1. Primer sequences for qPCR.

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Other Supplementary Material for this manuscript includes the following: